EL REY ARTURO

 

Personajes

PHILIDEL

GRIMBALD

Espíritu Benéfico del Aire

Espíritu Maléfico de la Tierra

Soprano

Barítono

 

La acción se desarrolla en las Islas Británicas, en época mítica.

 

ACT I 


Scene 1 

(King Arthur has secured all of his kingdom except 
Kent in the course often battles with the Saxons; they 
are led by Oswald, who has set out to win not only his 
throne but his love, the blind Emmeline, daughter of 
Conon, Duke of Cornwall. Arthur takes leave of her for 
the final, decisive battle against the heathen invader.) 

Scene 2 

(A place of heathen worship; the three saxon gods, 
Woden, Thor and Freya placed on pedestals; an altar. 
Oswald, his magician Osmond and the earthly evil
spirit Grimbald have brought victims for a sacrifice, to 
ensure victory in battle, and are preparing for the rites. 
Grimbald goes to the door, and re-enters with six 
Saxons in white, with swords in their hands. They 
range, themselves three and three in opposition to 
each other. The rest of the stage is filled with priests 
and singers.) 

BASS
Woden, first to thee
A milk-white steed, in battle won, 
We have sacrific'd.

CHORUS
We have sacrific'd.

TENOR II
Let our next oblation be
To Thor, thy thund'ring son, 
Of such another.

CHORUS
We have sacrific'd.

BASS
A third (of Friesland breed was he) 
To Woden's wife, and to Thor's mother; 
And now we have aton'd all three.

CHORUS
We have sacrific'd.

TENOR I & II
The white horse neigh'd aloud. 
To Woden thanks we render, 
To Woden we have vow'd, 
To Woden, our defender.

CHORUS
To Woden thanks we render, 
To Woden we have vow'd, 
To Woden, our defender.

SOPRANO
The lot is cast, and Tanfan pleas'd; 
Of mortal cares you shall be eas'd.

CHORUS
Brave souls, to be renown'd in story.
Honour prizing, 
Death despising, 
Fame acquiring 
By expiring, 
Die and reap the fruit of glory.

TENOR I
I call you all 
To Woden's Hall, 
Your temples round 
With ivy bound 
In goblets crown'd, 
And plenteous bowls of burnish'd gold, 
Where ye shall laugh 
And dance and quaff 
The juice that makes the Britons bold.

CHORUS
To Woden's Hall all,
Where in plenteous bowls of burnish'd gold,
We shall laugh
And dance and quaff
The juice that makes the Britons bold.

(The six Saxons are led off by the priests, in order to be 
sacrificed. Exeunt omnes. A battle supposed to be given 
behind the scenes, with drums, trumpets, and military 
shouts and excursions, after which the Britons, 
expressing their joy for the victory, sing this song of 
triumph.) 

TENOR II
"Come if you dare," our trumpets sound.
"Come if you dare," the foes rebound.
We come, we come, we come, we come,"
Says the double, double, double beat of 
the thund'ring drum.

CHORUS
"Come if you dare," our trumpets sound, etc.

TENOR II
Now they charge on amain.
Now they rally again.
The Gods from above the mad labour behold,
And pity mankind that will perish for gold.

CHORUS
Now they charge on amain, etc.

TENOR II
The fainting Saxons quit their ground, 
Their trumpets languish in their sound,
They fly, they fly, they fly, they fly,
"Victoria, Victoria," the bold Britons cry.

CHORUS
The fainting Saxons quit their ground, etc.

TENOR II
Now the victory's won,
To the plunder we run,
We return to our lasses like fortunate traders,
Triumphant with spoils of the vanquish'd invaders.

CHORUS
Now the victory's won, etc.

ACTO I 


Escena 1 

(Tras diez batallas contra los sajones, el rey 
Arturo ha tomado posesión de todo su reino, a 
excepción de Kent. El caudillo sajón, Oswald, 
tiene la intención de conquistar no solamente su 
trono sino también a su amada, la ciega Emilia, 
hija de Conon, duque de Cornualles) 

Escena 2  

(Lugar de culto pagano. Los dioses sajones, 
Wotan, Thor y Freia colocados sobre pedestales. 
Oswald, su mago Osmond y el espíritu maligno 
terrestre Grimbald, preparan a las víctimas para 
el sacrificio afín de asegurarse la victoria en el 
combate. Grimbald se dirige hacia la puerta y 
vuelve con diez sajones vestidos de blanco. Se 
colocan de tres en tres, frente a frente. El resto 
de la escena está ocupada por sacerdotes y 
cantores.) 

BAJO
Wotan, eres el primero al que hemos sacrificado
un potrillo blanco como la nieve, 
ganado en combate.

CORO
Hemos sacrificado...

TENOR II
Nuestra próxima ofrenda,
otro corcel, es para Thor,
tu fulminante hijo.

CORO
Hemos sacrificado...

BAJO
Un tercero, de raza desconocida,
a la esposa de Wotan, la madre de Thor.
De esta forma hemos propiciado a los tres.

CORO
Hemos sacrificado...

TENORES I, II
El caballo blanco relincha ruidosamente.
¡Wotan, te damos gracias!
¡Wotan, somos tus siervos!
¡Wotan, eres nuestro defensor!

CORO
¡Wotan, te damos gracias!
¡Wotan, somos tus siervos!
¡Wotan, eres nuestro defensor!

SOPRANO
La suerte está echada y Tanfan satisfecho.
De las preocupaciones mortales seréis liberados.

CORO
Almas valerosas, que la historia os recuerde.
Buscad el honor,
despreciad la muerte,
ganad la fama
expirando,
morid y recoged los frutos de la gloria.

TENOR I
Os invito a todos
al templo de Wotan.
Vuestras sienes serán ceñidas
por coronas 
de hiedra trenzada.
En grandes copas de oro bruñido,
reiremos, bailaremos 
y beberemos el brebaje que 
infunde valor a los bretones.

CORO
Todos al templo de Wotan,
donde en grandes copas de oro bruñido,
reiremos, bailaremos 
y beberemos el brebaje que 
infunde valor a los bretones.

(Los seis sajones son llevados por los sacerdotes 
para ser sacrificados. Todos salen. Tras los 
bastidores se supone que se libra una batalla, 
con tambores, trompetas y gritos militares, tras 
la cual, los bretones expresan su alegría por la 
victoria, entonando este canto de triunfo.) 

TENOR II
"Venid si os atrevéis" dicen nuestras trompetas.
"Venid si os atrevéis" responden los enemigos.
"Adelante, adelante, adelante, adelante"
dice el redoble, redoble, redoble de tambor 
que retumba.

CORO
"Venid si os atrevéis" dicen nuestras trompetas...

TENOR II
Ahora cargan con fuerza y regresan de nuevo.
Los dioses observan desde lo alto la dura batalla
y compadecen a los hombres 
capaces de dar su vida a causa del oro.

CORO
Ahora cargan con fuerza, etc.

TENOR II
Los sajones desfallecen y abandonan el lugar.
El sonido de sus trompetas languidece.
¡Huyen, huyen, huyen, huyen!
"Victoria, victoria" gritan los valerosos bretones.

CORO
Los sajones desfallecen y abandonan el lugar, etc.

TENOR II
Puesto que hemos conseguido la victoria,
corramos a por el botín.
Regresemos como mercaderes afortunados 
con el botín de los invasores vencidos.

CORO
Puesto que hemos conseguido la victoria, etc.

ACT II 


(Philidel, a repentant airy spirit, reports to Merlin that 
Grimbald is approaching and will attempt to mislead 
the conquering Britons to cliffs, where they will fall to 
their deaths, by telling them that they are pursuing the 
retreating Saxons. Merlin commands Philidel, assisted 
by his band of spirits, to protect the Britons and 
counter. Grimbald's forces. Exit Merlin in this chariot. 
Merlin's spirits stay with Philidel. Enter Grimbald in 
the habit of a shepherd, followed by King Arthur, 
Conon, Aurelius, Albanact and soldiers, who wander at 
a distance in the scenes) 

PHILIDEL
Hither, this way, this way bend, 
Trust not the malicious fiend. 
Those are false deluding lights 
Wafted far and near by sprites. 
Trust 'em not, for they'll deceive ye, 
And in bogs and marshes leave ye.

CHORUS OF PHILIDEL'S SPIRITS 
Hither, this way, this way bend.

CHORUS OF GRIMBALD' S SPIRITS 
This way, hither, this way bend.

PHILIDEL 
If you step no longer thinking, 
Down you fall, a furlong sinking. 
'Tis a fiend who has annoy'd ye: 
Name but Heav'n, and he'll avoid ye. 
Hither, this way.

PHILIDEL' S SPIRITS 
Hither, this way, this way bend.

GRIMBALD' S SPIRITS 
This way, hither, this way bend.

PHILIDEL' S SPIRITS 
Trust not the malicious fiend. 
Hither, this way, etc.

(Conon and Albanact are persuaded not to follow 
Grimbald any further, but Grimbald produces fresh 
footprints as proof that they are following the Saxons) 

GRIMBALD
Let not a moon-born elf mislead ye 
From your prey and from your glory; 
To fear, alas, he has betray'd ye; 
Follow the flames that wave before ye, 
Sometimes sev'n, and sometimes one. 
Hurry, hurry, hurry, hurry on.

Ritornello 

GRIMBALD 
See, see the footsteps plain appearing. 
That way Oswald chose for flying. 
Firm is the turf and fit for bearing, 
Where yonder pearly dews are lying. 
Far he cannot hence be gone. 
Hurry, hurry, hurry, hurry on.

(All are going to follow Grimbald.) 

Ritornello 

PHILIDEL'S SPIRITS
Hither, this way, this way bend.

GRIMBALD' S SPIRITS 
Hither, this way, this way bend.

PHILIDEL'S SPIRITS 
Trust not that malicious fiend. 
Hither, this way, etc.

(They all incline to Philidel. Grimbald curses 
Philidel and sinks with a flash. Arthur gives thanks 
that the fiend has vanished) 

PHILIDEL 
Come, follow me.

SOLOS 
Come, follow me, 
And me, and me, and me, and me.

CHORUS 
Come, follow me.

PHILIDEL, SOPRANO 
And green-sward all your way shall be.

CHORUS 
Come, follow me.

BASS
No goblin or elf shall dare to offend ye.

CHORUS
No goblin or elf shall dare to offend ye.

Ritornello 

TWO SOPRANOS, TENOR
We brethren of air
You heroes will bear
To the kind and the fair that attend ye.

CHORUS
We brethren of air, etc.

(Philidel and the spirits go off singing, with King 
Arthur and the rest in the middle of them. Enter 
Emmeline led by Matilda. Pavilion Scene. Emmeline 
and Matilda discuss King Arthur. Matilda entreats 
Emmeline to forget her cares and let a group of Kentish 
lads and lasses entertain her while she awaits Arthur's 
return. Enter shepherds and shepherdesses) 

SHEPHERD
How blest are shepherds, how happy their lasses,
While drums and trumpets are sounding alarms.
Over our lowly sheds all the storm passes
And when we die, 'tis in each other's arms
All the day on our herds and flocks employing,
All the night on our flutes and in enjoying.

CHORUS
How blest are shepherds, how happy their lasses, etc.

SHEPHERD
Bright nymphs of Britain with graces attended,
Let not your days without pleasure expire.
Honour's but empty, and when youth is ended,
All men will praise you but none will desire.
Let not youth fly away without contenting;
Age will come time enough for your repenting.

CHORUS
Bright nymphs of Britain with graces attended, etc.

(Here the men offer their flutes to the women, 
which they refuse) 

Symphony 

TWO SHEPHERDESSES
Shepherd, shepherd, leave decoying: 
Pipes are sweet on summer's day, 
But a little after toying, 
Women have the shot to pay.
Here are marriage-vows for signing: 
Set their marks that cannot write. 
After that, without repining, 
Play, and welcome, day and night.

(Here the women give the men contracts, 
which they accept.) 

CHORUS
Come, shepherds, lead up a lively measure
The cares of wedlock are cares of pleasure:
But whether marriage bring joy or sorrow.
Make sure of this day and hang tomorrow

Hornpipe 

(The dance after the song, and exeunt shepherds
and shepherdesses) 

Second Act Tune: Air 

(Emmeline and Matilda are captured by Oswald, who
has refused to release them during a parley with
Arthur. The Britons prepare to rescue Emmeline from
the Saxon fortress.)

ACTO II 


(Philidel, espíritu benéfico del aire, cuenta a 
Merlín que Grimbald se acerca y que intenta 
arrojar a los conquistadores britanos al 
acantilado donde morirán, diciéndoles que vayan 
en persecución de los sajones. Merlín ordena 
a Philidel que ayude con su ejército de espíritus 
a proteger a los bretones y que se oponga a las 
fuerzas de Grimbald. Merlín baja de su carro. 
Los espíritus de Merlín quedan con Philidel. 
Grimbald entra vestido de pastor, seguido por el 
rey Arturo, Conon, Aurelio, Albanact y soldados) 

PHILIDEL
¡Por aquí, por aquí, tomad este camino,
no os fiéis del malévolo enemigo!
Aquellas son falsas luces
que los duendes hacen brillar aquí y allá.
No os fiéis de ellas porque os perderán
y os arrojarán a los pantanos y ciénagas.

CORO DE LOS ESPIRITUS DE PHILIDEL
¡Por aquí, por aquí, tomad este camino!

CORO DE LOS ESPIRITUS DE GRIMBALD
¡Por aquí, por aquí, tomad este camino!

PHILIDEL
Si dais un paso en falso,
caeréis desde una altura de un furlong.
Es el enemigo que os quiere perder.
Invocad al cielo y él os protegerá.
¡Por aquí, por aquí!

ESPIRITUS DE PHILIDEL
¡Por aquí, por aquí, tomad este camino!

ESPIRITUS DE GRIMBALD
¡Por aquí, por aquí, tomad este camino!

ESPIRITUS DE PHILIDEL
No os fiéis del malévolo enemigo.
¡Por aquí, por aquí, tomad este camino!

(Conon y Albanact, convencidos, rehusan seguir 
a Grimbald, pero éste les enseña las huellas de 
pasos para probarles que están tras los sajones) 

GRIMBALD
No dejéis que un elfo lunar os aparte
de vuestra presa y de vuestra gloria.
Os ha traicionado y os asusta.
Seguid las llamas que brillan delante de vosotros,
ahora siete, ahora una.
¡Apresuraos, apresuraos, apresuraos, apresuraos!

Ritornello 

GRIMBALD
Mirad estas huellas tan claras.
Es el camino que Oswald ha escogido para huir.
El terreno está firme y sabrá llevaros
allí donde yacen perlas rosadas. 
No pueden estar lejos de aquí.
¡Apresuraos, apresuraos, apresuraos, apresuraos!

(Todos se preparan para seguir a Grimbald) 

Ritornello 

ESPIRITUS DE PHILIDEL
¡Por aquí, por aquí, tomad este camino!

ESPIRITUS DE GRIMBALD
¡Por aquí, por aquí, tomad este camino!

ESPIRITUS DE PHILIDEL
No os fiéis del malévolo enemigo.
¡Por aquí, por aquí, tomad este camino!

(Todos siguen a Philidel. Grimbald maldice a 
Philidel y desaparece con un relámpago. Arturo 
da gracias por la desaparición del enemigo) 

PHILIDEL
¡Venid, seguidme!

SOLISTAS
¡Venid, seguidme!
¡Y a mí, y a mí, y a mí, y a mí!

CORO
¡Venid, seguidme!

PHILIDEL, SOPRANO
¡Y vuestro camino permanecerá siempre verde!

CORO
¡Venid, seguidme!

BAJO
Ningún duende, ningún elfo osará perjudicaros.

CORO
Ningún duende, ningún elfo osará perjudicaros.

Ritornello 

DOS SOPRANOS, TENOR
Nosotros, hermanos del aire, 
llevaremos a los héroes 
hasta las dulces mujeres que los esperan.

CORO
Nosotros, hermanos del aire, etc.

(Philidel y los espíritus se van cantando, 
haciendo círculos alrededor de Arturo. Escena 
del pabellón. Emilia y Matilde hablan de 
Arturo. Matilde invita a Emilia a olvidad sus 
preocupaciones y a dejarse divertir por un grupo 
de jóvenes de Kent mientras esperan a Arturo. 
Entran pastores y pastoras.)

UN PASTOR
Felices están los pastores y sus compañeras,
mientras que tambores y trompetas resuenan.
La tormenta pasa sobre nuestras cabañas y,
cuando muramos, permaneceremos abrazados.
Por el día esperamos a nuestras tropas y por 
la noche, nos divertimos al son de las flautas.

CORO
Felices están los pastores y sus compañeras, etc.

UN PASTOR
Radiantes ninfas de Bretaña colmadas de gracia,
no dejéis pasar vuestros días sin placer.
El honor es pasajero y, cuando la juventud muera,
los hombres os alabarán pero ninguno os deseará.
No desaprovechéis vuestra juventud pues el 
tiempo habrá pasado para cuando os arrepintáis.

CORO
Radiantes ninfas de Bretaña colmadas de gracia...

(Los hombres ofrecen sus flautas a las mujeres,
que las rechazan) 

Sinfonía 

DOS PASTORAS
Pastor, pastor, deja de seducirnos.
Las flautas son dulces para un día de verano, 
pero tras el juego, 
las mujeres deben pagar el precio.
Aquí están los contratos matrimoniales:
los que no sepan firmar que pongan su marca.
Después, sin reparo, vuestros cantos
serán bienvenidos noche y día.

(Las mujeres dan a los hombres los contratos,
que ellos aceptan.) 

CORO
¡Venid, pastores, moveos con ritmo alegre!
Los problemas del matrimonio son los del placer,
pero la alianza trae alegría o tristeza.
Vivid el hoy y no penséis en el mañana.

Hornpipe 

(El canto termina con la danza, y los pastores y
pastoras salen.) 

Música del final del segundo acto: Aria 

(Emilia y Matilde han sido capturadas por 
Oswald. Los bretones se preparan para ir 
a rescatarlas resueltamente a la fortaleza 
de los sajones.)

ACT III 


Scene 1 

(The Britons are panicked by the magic horrors that
have been put around the Saxon fortress to protect it 
and want to retreat. Arthur, however, is prepared to 
attempt to penetrate them alone. Merlin advises him to 
wait until after the spells have been broken, but does 
promise to spirit him off to the captive Emmeline, and 
to restore her sight) 

Scene 2 

A Deep Wood 

(Philidel is captured by Grimbald while trying to find 
Emmeline, but he escapes and casts a strong spell over 
the evil spirit. Merlin and Arthur enter; Merlin gives 
Philidel a vial containing the drops that will restore 
Emmeline's sight and leaves to attempt to dispel the 
dire enchantments in the wood. Emmeline and Matilda 
enter from the far end of the wood. Arthur withdraws as 
Philidel approaches Emmeline, sprinkling some of the 
water out of the vial over her eyes. Emmeline sees 
Arthur for the first time, and tells him that not only 
Oswald, but also Osmond desires her love. Airy spirits 
appear to congratulate her on the recovery of her sight, 
but then vanish when Philidel announces the approach 
of their foes. Emmeline and Matilda are left alone. 
Osmond, whom Emmeline now sees for the first time, 
ardently woos her and boasts how he has thrown 
Oswald into prison. Emmeline, frozen with terror, 
refuses his advances, but Osmond assures her that Love 
will thaw her, and demonstrates by using his magic 
wand to change Britain's mild clime to Iceland and 
farthest Thule's frost.) 

The Frost Scene 

Prelude 

(Osmond strikes the ground with his wand, the scene 
changes to a prospect of winter in frozen countries. 
Cupid descends) 

CUPID
What ho! thou genius of this isle, what ho! 
Liest thou asleep beneath those hills of snow? 
Stretch Out thy lazy limbs. Awake, awake! 
And winter from thy furry mantle shake.

Prelude 

(Genius arises.) 

COLD GENIUS
What power art thou, who from below 
Hast made me rise unwillingly and slow 
From beds of everlasting snow? 
See'st thou not how stiff and wondrous old, 
Far unfit to bear the bitter cold, 
I can scarcely move or draw my breath? 
Let me, let me freeze again to death.

CUPID
Thou doting fool forbear, forbear! 
What dost thou mean by freezing here? 
At Love's appearing, All the sky clearing, 
The stormy winds their fury spare.
Winter subduing, 
And Spring renewing, 
My beams create a more glorious year. 
Thou doting fool, forbear, forbear! 
What dost thou mean by freezing here?

COLD GENIUS
Great Love, I know thee now: 
Eldest of the gods art thou. 
Heav'n and earth by thee were made.
Human nature is thy creature, 
Ev'rywhere thou art obey'd.

CUPID 
No part of my dominion shall he waste: 
To spread my sway and sing my praise 
E'en here I will a people raise 
Of kind embracing lovers, and embrac'd.

(Cupid waves his wand, upon which the scene opens, 
discovers a prospect of ice and snow. Singers and 
dancers, men and women, appear.) 

Prelude 

CHORUS OF COLD PEOPLE
See, see, we assemble 
Thy revels to hold: 
Tho' quiv'ring with cold 
We chatter and tremble.

Dance 

CUPID
'Tis I, 'tis I, 'tis I that have warm'd ye.
In spite of cold weather
I've brought ye together.
'Tis I, 'tis I, 'tis I that have warm'd ye,

Ritornello 

CHORUS
'Tis Love, 'tis Love, 'tis Love 
that has warm'd us.
In spite of the weather 
He brought us together. 
'Tis Love, 'tis Love, 'tis Love 
that has warm'd us.

CUPID & COLD GENIUS 
Sound a parley, ye fair, and surrender, 
Set yourselves and your lovers at ease.
He's a grateful offender 
Who pleasure dare seize: 
But the whining pretender 
Is sure to displease.
Sound a parley, ye fair, and surrender.
Since the fruit of desire is possessing, 
'Tis unmanly to sigh and complain. 
When we kneel for redressing, 
We move your disdain. 
Love was made for a blessing 
And not for a pain.

Ritornello 

CHORUS
'Tis Love, 'tis Love, 'tis Love 
that has warm'd us, etc.

Third Act Tune: Hornpipe 

(A dance; after which the singers and dancers depart. 
Emmeline is saved from Osmond's lustful advances 
when the ensnared Grimbald cries out, compelling 
the magician to go to the rescue of his evil spirit)

ACTO III 


Escena 1 

(Los bretones titubean al ver la tremenda magia 
que protege la fortaleza sajona y quieren batirse 
en retirada. Arturo, sin embargo, está dispuesto a 
penetrar en ella. Merlín le aconseja que espere a 
que el hechizo hay sido conjurado y le promete 
que lo transportará hasta la cautiva Emilia y 
devolverle la vista a ésta) 

Escena 2 

Un espeso bosque 

(Philidel es capturado por Grimbald mientras 
que intentaba encontrar a Emilia, pero escapa 
y hechiza al espíritu maligno. Merlín y Arturo 
entran, Merlín da a Philidel un frasco que 
contiene las gotas que devolverán a Emilia 
la vista. Emilia y Matilde salen del bosque y 
entran. Arturo se retira mientras que Philidel 
se aproxima a Emilia vertiendo un poco del 
contenido del frasco sobre sus ojos. Emilia ve 
a Arturo por primera vez y le dice que no sólo 
Oswald, sino también Osmond la desean. Unos 
espíritus del aire aparecen para felicitarla por 
haber recobrado la vista cuando Philidel anuncia 
la llegada de sus enemigos. Emilia y Matilde se 
quedan solas. Osmond, a quien Emilia ve ahora 
por primera vez, la corteja ardientemente y se 
jacta de haber metido a Oswald en prisión. 
Emilia lo rechaza pero Osmond le asegura que 
el Amor la confortará y le muestra, con su varita 
mágica, que puede transformar el clima dulce de 
Bretaña en el de Islandia o en el de Thule) 

Escena Del Frío 

Preludio 

(Osmond golpea al sol con su varita. El escenario 
se transforma en un paisaje invernal de terrenos 
helados. Cupido desciende.) 

CUPIDO
¡Eh, tú, genio de la isla!
¿Te has dormido bajo estas colinas de nieve?
Estira tus perezosos miembros. ¡Arriba! ¡Arriba!
Retira el invierno de tu manto protector.

Preludio 

(El genio se levanta.) 

GENIO DEL FRIO
¿Qué poder tienes que, contra mi voluntad, 
me has hecho levantarme 
de las profundidades de nieve eterna?
¿No ves que, rígido y demasiado viejo,
incapaz de soportar el rigor del frío,
a penas puedo moverme y respirar?
¡Déjame, déjame morir de frío!

CUPIDO
¡Viejo loco, cálmate, cálmate!
¿Cómo puedes permanecer aquí helado?
Con la aparición del Amor, el cielo se despeja
y los vientos tempestuosos retienen su rabia.
Subyugando al invierno
y renovando la primavera, 
mis rayos dan lugar a un año más glorioso.
¡Viejo loco, cálmate, cálmate!
¿Cómo puedes permanecer aquí helado?

GENIO DEL FRIO
Amor supremo, ahora te reconozco.
Tú eres el primogénito de los dioses.
Cielo y tierra por ti han sido creados.
La naturaleza humana es tu obra
y en todas partes se someten a ti.

CUPIDO
Ninguno de mis dominios permanecerá incultivo.
Para extender mi imperio y cantar mi alabanza,
haré nacer un pueblo de tiernos amantes
que se abracen y sean abrazados.

(Cupido agita su varita y la escena se abre a un 
paisaje de hielo y nieve. Cantantes y bailarines 
aparecen) 

Preludio 

CORO DEL PUEBLO DEL FRIO
Mira, mira, nos reunimos 
para celebrar tu fiesta,
mientras que tiritando de frío,
temblamos y chasqueamos los dientes.

Danza 

CUPIDO
Soy yo, soy yo quien os ha reconfortado.
A pesar del frío 
os he reunido.
Soy yo, soy yo quien os ha reconfortado.

Ritornello 

CORO
Es el Amor, es el Amor, es el Amor
quien nos ha reconfortado.
A pesar del frío
él nos ha reunido.
Es el Amor, es el Amor, es el Amor 
quien nos ha reconfortado.

CUPIDO, EL GENIO DEL FRIO
Poneos de acuerdo, bellas mías y rendiros.
Quedaos vosotras y vuestros amantes tranquilos.
Es un verdadero loco
el que intenta alcanzar el placer,
pues siempre el quejoso pretendiente
quedará insatisfecho.
Poneos de acuerdo, bellas mías y rendiros.
El fruto del deseo es la posesión y es indigno 
de un hombre que suspire y se complazca.
Cuando nos arrodillamos para pedir perdón,
no suscitamos más que vuestro desprecio.
El amor está hecho para la alegría
y no para el sufrimiento

Ritornello 

CORO
Es el Amor, es el Amor, es el Amor 
quien nos ha reconfortado.

Música Del Final Del Tercer Acto: Hornpipe 

(Baile, tras el cual los bailarines se van .Emilia 
es salvada de los avances lascivos de Osmond 
cuando Grimbald, capturado, grita y obliga al 
mago a ir en socorro de su espíritu maligno)

ACT IV 


Scene 1 

(Osmond learns that Merlin has broken his spells 
but plans to cast new spells and seduce Arthur with 
visions of beauty) 

Scene 2 

The Wood 

(Arthur, having first been warned by Merlin that 
everything he sees is illusion, is left alone in the wood 
under the watchful eye of Philidel, who can reveal any 
evil spirits with a wave of Merlin's wand. Arthur is 
amazed that instead of the horrors and dangers he had 
expected, he hears soft music and sees a golden bridge 
spanning a silver stream. Though suspecting a trap, he 
approaches the bridge. Two sirens naked to the waist, 
emerge, begging him to lay aside his sword and join 
them) 

TWO SIRENS
Two daughters of this aged stream are we,
And both our sea-green locks have comb'd for ye.
Come bathe with us an hour or two;
Come naked in, for we are so.
What danger from a naked foe?
Come bathe with us, come bathe, and share
What pleasures in the floods appear.
We'll beat the waters till they bound
And circle round, and circle round.

(Though sorely tempted, Arthur resists and presses on.
As he is going forward, nymphs and sylvans come out 
from behind the trees. Dance with song, all with 
branches in their bands) 

Passacaglia 

TENOR I
How happy the lover,
How easy his chain!
How sweet to discover
He sighs not in vain.

CHORUS
How happy the lover, etc.

Ritornello 

SYLVAN & NYMPH
For love ev'ry creature
Is form'd by his nature. 
No joys are above
The pleasures of love.

CHORUS
No joys are above.
The pleasures of love.

THREE NYMPHS
In vain are our graces, 
In vain are your eyes. 
In vain are our graces 
If love you despise.
When age furrows faces, 
'Tis too late to be wise.

THREE SYLVANS
Then use the sweet blessing 
While now in possessing.
No joys are above
The pleasures of love.

THREE NYMPHS 
No joys are above
The pleasures of love.

CHORUS
No joys are above
The pleasures of love.

Fourth Act Tune: Air 

(Arthur commands the sylvans, nymphs and sirens 
begone and they vanish. In an attempt to break the 
spells, he draws his sword and strikes a blow at the 
finest tree in the wood. A vision of Emmeline appears 
from its trunk, her arm wounded by the blow; it per 
suades him to lay down his sword and take her hand. 
Philidel rushes in, and with a touch of the wand reveals 
the vision to be Grimbald in disguise, Arthur then fells 
the tree, breaking the spells and opening a safe passage 
for the Britons to the Saxon fortress. Grimbald is bound 
up by Philidel and led out into daylight)

ACTO IV 


Escena 1 

(Osmond se da cuenta de que Merlín ha 
empezado un encantamiento con la intención de 
atraer de nuevo a Arturo con bellas visiones) 

Escena 2 

El Bosque 

(Arturo, prevenido por Merlín de que todo lo 
que ve es una ilusión, se queda solo en el bosque 
bajo la mirada de Philidel, que puede detectar 
cualquier espíritu maligno blandiendo la varita 
mágica de Merlín. Arturo, en lugar de horrores 
y peligros, oye una dulce música y ve un punto 
dorado que cruza un arroyo. Desconfiando de 
que sea una trampa, se acerca al puente. Dos 
sirenas de senos desnudos emergen, suplicándole 
que deje su espada y se reúna con ellas) 

LAS DOS SIRENAS
Somos dos hijas de este antiguo río y para ti 
hemos peinado nuestros bucles verdemar.
Ven a bañarte con nosotras una hora o dos,
ven a bañarte desnudo, como nosotras.
¿Qué temer de un enemigo desnudo?
Ven a bañarte con nosotras y a compartir 
los placeres que nacen entre las olas.
Luchamos con las aguas hasta que se agitan 
y forman un círculo.

(A pesar de la fuerte tentación, Arturo resiste
y sigue su camino. Mientras camina, ninfas y 
silvos salen de detrás de los árboles. Bailan y 
cantan, llevando ramas en sus manos.) 

Pasacalle 

TENOR I
¡Feliz el amante!
¡Ligera es su cadena!
Con dulzura descubre
que no suspira en vano.

CORO
¡Feliz el amante! etc.

Ritornello 

SILVOS, NINFAS
Toda criatura, por naturaleza,
está hecha para el amor.
Ninguna alegría supera
los placeres del amor.

CORO
Ninguna alegría supera
los placeres del amor.

LAS TRES NINFAS
Vanas son vuestras gracias,
vanas son vuestras miradas,
vanas son vuestras gracias
si desdeñáis el amor.
Cuando la edad arruga los rostros
es demasiado tarde para arrepentirse.

LOS TRES SILVOS
Aprovechad entonces esa dulce ventaja
ahora que la poseéis.
Ninguna alegría supera
los placeres del amor.

LAS TRES NINFAS
Ninguna alegría supera
los placeres del amor.

CORO
Ninguna alegría supera
los placeres del amor.

MUSICA Del Final Del Acto Cuarto: Aria 

(Arturo ordena a los silvos, ninfas y sirenas que 
desaparezcan. Para hacer un encantamiento, 
golpea con su espada a un bello árbol. Surge 
entonces del tronco Emilia, con el brazo herido 
por el golpe; ella le persuade para que deje su 
espada. Philidel llega y con un golpe de su varita 
mágica revela que bajo esa aparición se oculta 
Grimbald. Arturo abate al árbol, rompiendo el 
encantamiento y abriendo para los bretones un 
pasaje hasta la fortaleza sajona. Grimbald es 
maniatado y conducido a la luz del día)

ACT V 


Scene 1 

(Osmond's spells have been broken and his spirit 
Grimbald captured. He decides to release Oswald 
from the prison in the hope that together they may 
at last defeat Arthur) 

Scene 2 

(The Britons march on the Saxon fortress, and are met 
by Oswald, who proposes the war be decided in single 
combat with Arthur. After a very close fight, in which 
the two magicians are also pitted against each other, 
Arthur finally succeeds in disarming Oswald, but 
grants him his life) 

Trumpet Tune 

(A consort of trumpets within, proclaiming Arthur's 
victory. While they sound, Arthur and Oswald seem to 
confer. Arthur commands Oswald to return to Saxony 
with his men. Emmeline is restored to Arthur. Merlin 
imprisons Osmond and proclaims the triumph of British 
sovereignty, faith and love. Merlin waves his wand; the 
scene changes, and discovers the British Ocean in a 
storm. Aeolus in a cloud above: Four Winds hanging, 
etc.) 

AEOLUS
Ye blust'ring brethren of the skies,
Whose breath has ruffled all the wat'ry plain,
Retire, and let Britannia rise
In triumph o'er the main.
Serene and calm, and void of fear,
The Queen of Islands must appear.

(Aeolus ascends, and the Four Winds fly off. The scene 
opens, and discovers a calm sea, to the end of the 
house. An island arises, to a soft tune; Britannia seated 
in the island, with fishermen at her feet, etc. The tune 
changes; the fisher men come ashore, and dance a 
while; after which, Pan and a Nereid come on the 
stage, and sing) 

Symphony 

NEREID, PAN
Round thy coast, fair nymph of Britain,
For thy guard our waters flow:
Proteus all his herd admitting
On thy green to graze below:
Foreign lands thy fish are tasting;
Learn from thee luxurious fasting.

CHORUS
Round thy coast, fair nymph of Britain, etc.

ALTO, TENOR, BASS
For folded flocks, and fruitful plains, 
The shepherd's and the farmer's gains, 
Fair Britain all the world outvies; 
And Pan, as in Arcadia, reigns 
Where pleasure mix'd with profit lies.
Tho' Jason's fleece was fam'd of old, 
The British wool is growing gold; 
No mines can more of wealth supply: 
It keeps the peasants from the cold, 
And takes for kings the Tyrian dye.

(Enter Comus with peasants.) 

COMUS
Your hay, it is mow'd and your corn is reap'd,
Your barns will be full and your hovels heap'd.
Come, boys, come,
Come, boys, come,
And merrily roar out our harvest home.

CHORUS OF PEASANTS
Harvest home,
Harvest home,
And merrily roar out our harvest home.

COMUS
We've cheated the parson, we'll cheat him again,
For why shou'd a blockhead have one in ten?
One in ten, one in ten,
For why shou'd a blockhead have one in ten?

PEASANTS
One in ten, one in ten,
For why shou'd a blockhead have one in ten?

COMUS
For prating so long, like a book-learn'd sot,
Till pudding and dumpling are burnt to the pot:
Burnt to pot, burnt to pot,
Till pudding and dumpling are burnt to pot.

PEASANTS
Burnt to pot, burnt to pot,
Till pudding and dumpling are burnt to the pot.

COMUS
We'll toss off our ale till we cannot stand;
And heigh for the honour of old England;
Old England, Old England,
And heigh for the honour of old England.

PEASANTS
Old England, Old England,
And heigh for the honour of old England.

Dance 

(The dance varied into a round country-dance.
Enter Venus.) 

VENUS
Fairest isle, all isles excelling,
Seat of pleasure and of love;
Venus here will choose her dwelling,
And forsake her Cyprian grove.
Cupid from his fav'rite nation,
Care and envy will remove;
Jealousy that poisons passion,
And despair that dies for love.
Gentle murmurs, sweet complaining,
Sighs that blow the fire of love;
Soft repulses, Kind disdaining,
Shall be all the pains you prove.
Ev'ry swain shall pay his duty,
Grateful ev'ry nymph shall prove;
And as these excel in beauty, 
Those shall be renown'd for love.

SHE
You say, 'tis Love creates the pain, 
Of which so sadly you complain, 
And yet would fain engage my heart 
In that uneasy cruel part; 
But how, alas! think you that 
I Can bear the wounds of which you die?

HE
'Tis not my passion makes my care, 
But your indiff'rence gives despair: 
The lusty sun begets no spring 
Till gentle show'rs assistance bring; 
So Love, that scorches and destroys, 
Till kindness aids, can cause no joys.

SHE 
Love has a thousand ways to please, 
But more to rob us of our ease; 
For waking nights and careful days, 
Some hours of pleasure he repays; 
But absence soon, or jealous fears, 
O'erflows the joy with floods of tears.

HE 
But one soft moment makes amends 
For all the torment that attends.

BOTH
Let us love, let us love and to happiness haste.
Age and wisdom come too fast.
Youth for loving was design'd.

HE
I'll be constant, you be kind.

SHE 
You be constant, I'll be kind.

BOTH 
Heav'n can give no greater blessing 
Than faithful love and kind possessing.

Trumpet Tune (Warlike Consort) 

(The scene opens above, and discovers the Order 
of the Garter. Enter Honour, attended by heroes.) 

HONOUR
Saint George, the patron of our Isle, 
A soldier and a saint, 
On this auspicious order smile, 
Which love and arms will plant.

CHORUS 
Our natives not alone appear 
To court the martial prize;
But foreign kings adopted here 
Their crowns at home despise.
Our Sov'reign high, 'in awful state, 
His honours shall bestow; 
and see his sceptred subjects wait 
On his commands below.



  
ACTO V 


Escena 1 

(Osmond ha realizado un encantamiento y 
Grimbald ha sido capturado. Osmond decide 
liberar a Oswald de la prisión con la esperanza 
de que juntos puedan por fin vencer a Arturo) 

Escena 2 

(Los bretones marchan hacia la fortaleza sajona. 
Oswald, que se ha reunido con ellos, propone que 
el resultado de la guerra sea decidido en un 
combate singular con Arturo. Tras una reñida 
lucha que opone igualmente a los dos magos, 
Arturo consigue desarmar a Oswald) 

Trumpet Tune 

(Unas trompetas proclaman la victoria de Arturo. 
Arturo y Oswald parecen negociar. Arturo 
ordena a Oswald que regrese a Sajonia con sus 
hombres. Emilia es devuelta a Arturo. Merlín 
mete a Osmond en prisión y proclama el triunfo 
de la soberanía británica, de la fe y del amor. 
Merlín blande su varita mágica y aparece el 
Océano Británico en plena tempestad. Eolo en 
una nube: los Cuatro Vientos causan estragos.) 

EOLO
Hermanos impetuosos de los cielos
cuya respiración ha crispado el sereno líquido,
retiraos y dejad a Britania alzarse triunfante
sobre las olas.
Serena, tranquila y sin temor,
la reina de las islas debe aparecer.

(Eolo desciende y los Cuatro Vientos se van. Se 
levanta el telón y se ve un mar en calma. Una isla 
surge al son de una dulce melodía. Britania está 
sentada en la isla, con unos pescadores a sus 
pies. La música cambia; los pescadores se 
acercan a la orilla y bailan un poco, después Pan 
y Nereida entran en escena y se ponen a cantar.) 

Sinfonía 

NEREIDA, PAN
Alrededor de tu costa, bella ninfa de Bretaña,
para defenderte corren nuestras olas.
Proteo hace aparecer su rebaño
sobre tus verdes llanuras,
los países extranjeros degustan tus pescados
y admiran tu fastuosa firmeza.

CORO
Alrededor de tu costa, bella ninfa de Bretaña, etc.

ALTO, TENOR, BAJO
Rebaños guardados y llanuras fecundas
para ganancia del pastor y del granjero,
la bella Bretaña supera al mundo entero;
y Pan, como en Arcadia, reina
allí donde el placer saca partido.
El Toisón de Jasón goza de justa fama,
pero la lana bretona es realmente de oro,
ninguna mina sabría dar tanta riqueza.
Ella protege a los campesinos del frío
y se transforma para los reyes en la tinta de Tiro.

(Comus entra con unos campesinos.) 

COMUS
Vuestro heno es cortado y vuestro trigo segado,
las granjas están llenas y los cobertizos repletos.
¡Venid, jóvenes, venid!
¡Venid, jóvenes, venid,
y cantad con alegría el fin de la recolección!

CORO DE CAMPESINOS
¡El fin de la recolección!
¡El fin de la recolección,
y cantad con alegría el fin de la recolección!

COMUS
Engañamos al pastor y lo engañaremos de nuevo.
¿Para qué debe tener un asno el diezmo?
El diezmo, el diezmo...
¿Para qué debe tener un asno el diezmo?

CAMPESINOS
El diezmo, el diezmo...
¿Para qué debe tener un asno el diezmo?

COMUS
Dice tantas tonterías como un majadero erudito.
La morcilla y las albóndigas 
se han quemado en la marmita.
La morcilla y las albóndigas se han quemado.

CAMPESINOS
Quemado en la marmita, quemado en la marmita.
La morcilla y las albóndigas se han quemado.

COMUS
Beberemos cerveza hasta caer borrachos,
por el honor de la vieja Inglaterra,
la vieja Inglaterra, la vieja Inglaterra,
por el honor de la vieja Inglaterra.

CAMPESINOS
La vieja Inglaterra, la vieja Inglaterra,
por el honor de la vieja Inglaterra.

Danza 

(La danza se convierte en un baile campestre.
Entra Venus.) 

VENUS
Bellísima isla, que supera a las demás,
sede del placer y del amor.
Venus fija aquí su morada
renunciando a su bosque chipriota.
Cupido de su nación favorita
suprime las preocupaciones, la envidia,
los celos que envenenan la pasión
y la desesperación que ansía el amor.
Dulces susurros, delicados lamentos,
suspiros que aventa el fuego del amor,
tiernas negativas, amables desdenes,
serán los únicos sufrimientos que conoceréis.
Cada joven presentará sus ofrendas,
cada ninfa se mostrará agradecida
y si éstas destacan en belleza
serán llamadas al amor.

ELLA
Dices que el Amor produce el sufrimiento
en el que te complaces tan tristemente
y sin embargo, comprometes mi corazón
en este papel difícil y cruel.
¡Pero cómo! ¿Crees que puedo soportar 
el dolor de verte morir?

ÉL
No es mi pasión quien me hace sufrir,
sino tu indiferencia la que me aflige.
El calor del sol no trae la primavera
si las delicadas lluvias no le ofrecen su ayuda,
incluso el Amor, que quema y destruye, no
produce alegría si no va acompañado de ternura.

ELLA
El amor tiene mil formas de agradar,
pero aún más de robarnos la calma,
noches de insomnio y días de inquietud.
Nos regala algunas horas de placer,
pero pronto la ausencia, o el temor de los celos,
inundan la alegría con torrentes de lágrimas.

ÉL
Pero un dulce momento compensa
todos los tormentos que le siguen.

LOS DOS
Amémonos y alcancemos nuestra felicidad.
La vejez y la sensatez llegan demasiado rápido.
La juventud está hecha para amarse.

ÉL 
Yo seré fiel, tú serás cariñosa.

ELLA
Tú serás fiel, yo seré cariñosa.

LOS DOS
El cielo no puede dar mayor bendición
que el amor fiel y la tierna posesión.

Trompet Tune (Conjunto Marcial) 

(Se alza el telón y se ve la orden de las jarreteras.
Entra el Honor, seguido de los héroes.) 

HONOR
San Jorge, patrón de nuestra isla,
soldado y santo,
sonríe a esta orden propicia,
donde el amor y las armas se aúnan.

CORO
Nuestros compatriotas no están solos
al solicitar la recompensa marcial.
Reyes extranjeros han aceptado aquí
las coronas que desdeñaron en su patria.
Nuestro gran soberano, en su majestad,
nos otorgará sus favores 
y verá a los que llevan su cetro 
esperar sus órdenes.



Escaneado y Traducido por:
María del Mar Huete 2003